St Benedict Magnet with Prayer Card- patron of disease, witchcraft

SKU: MAG030
R 25,00
St Benedict Magnet with Prayer Card

Durable, flexible magnet on the fridge or elsewhere, are daily reminders of the power of prayer.

Magnet - approx 6cm H
Card - 7.5 x 5 cm

Benedict of Nursia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Saint Benedict of Nursia
Fra Angelico 031.jpg
Saint Benedict Detail from a fresco by Fra Angelico
Abbot
Patron of Europe
Born c. 480
Norcia (Umbria, Italy)
Died 21 March 543 (aged 64)
Monte Cassino
Honored in Roman Catholicism
Anglican Communion
Eastern Orthodoxy
Lutheran Church
Canonized 1220, Rome by Pope Honorius III
Major shrine

Monte Cassino Abbey, with his burial
Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, near Orléans, France

Sacro Speco, at Subiaco, Italy
Feast July 11 (Roman Catholic calendar of saints), (Anglican Communion)
March 14 (Byzantine Rite)
March 21 (on local calendars and in the General Roman Calendar of 1962)
Attributes -Bell
-Broken tray
-Broken cup and serpent representing poison
-Broken utensil
-Bush
-Crosier
-Man in a Benedictine cowl holding Benedict's rule or a rod of discipline
-Raven
Patronage -Against poison
-Against witchcraft
-Agricultural workers
-Cavers
-Civil engineers
-Coppersmiths
-Dying people
-Erysipelas
-Europe
-Farmers
-Fever
-Gall stones
-Heerdt (Germany)
-Heraldry and Officers of arms
-the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest
-Inflammatory diseases
-Italian architects
-Kidney disease
-Monks
-Nettle rash
-Norcia (Italy)
-People in religious orders
-Schoolchildren
-Servants who have broken their master's belongings
-Speliologists
-Spelunkers
-Temptations

Benedict of Nursia (Italian: San Benedetto da Norcia) (c. 480 – 21 March 543 or 547) is a Christian saint, honored by the Anglican Church and the Catholic Church as the patron saint of Europe and students.[1]

Benedict founded twelve communities for monks at Subiaco, Italy (about 40 miles (64 km) to the east of Rome), before moving to Monte Cassino in the mountains of southern Italy. The Catholic Order of St Benedict and the Anglican Order of St Benedict are of later origin and, moreover, not an "order" as commonly understood but merely a confederation of autonomous congregations.[2]

Benedict's main achievement is his "Rule of Saint Benedict", containing precepts for his monks. It is heavily influenced by the writings of John Cassian, and shows strong affinity with the Rule of the Master. But it also has a unique spirit of balance, moderation and reasonableness (ἐπιείκεια, epieikeia), and this persuaded most religious communities founded throughout the Middle Ages to adopt it. As a result, his Rule became one of the most influential religious rules in Western Christendom. For this reason, Benedict is often called the founder of western monasticism